ca. 1922 Hawkes Panormo 7/8 carved back

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IMG_0949This recently restored ca. 1922 Hawkes Panormo 7/8 carved back bass lead a long jazz life with regular gigging and teaching play by its last owner from 1967 through 2011. It has a connection with Charles Mingus, as described below in the last paragraph. Fine-medium grain spruce top, Heavily flame figured Maple back, sides, and neck, Brass french style single unit tuners, Ebony nut, fingerboard, tail[piece saddle, and german-made Hill style tailpiece, Aubert De Luxe bridge with aluminum adjusters added as part of a comprehensive setup, 10 mm steel rod endpin, Dark brown oil vanish finish, Small Ebony side bumpers added long ago. Dimensions are: Top length 43 1/2″, Upper bout width 22″, Middle bout width 14 7/8″, Lower bout 26″, Depth at neck 6 1/4″, Depth at upper bout corner 9 3/8″, Depth at tail 9 1/4″, String length 41 3/4″. The distinctive top outline of the Hawkes model is derived from the late 19th century practice of cutting down in the upper bout the very large older german and english basses, which allowed for shorter string lengths and better access to the upper fingerboard. Hawkes basses were commonly purchased new for colleges and military bands, but have become very popular among orchestral players. The highly arched back, deep upper bout back crease, and dramatic corners all point to the italian model that was the inspiration for this design. The intensive restoration work by Allan Droyan has brought this instrument back to top playing form after living a somewhat rugged jazz life. With cover.

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Charles Mingus was at a high point in his playing career when he embarked on a european tour in 1964 with a celebrated experimental band. While there, he auditioned this bass and intended to purchase it on his next tour for classic music arco play and composing. ┬áDeterioration in his mental health and professional circumstances prevented Mingus’ quick return to Europe. The last owner was a professional touring journeyman jazz player who had his personal bass destroyed by the airline on the way to a european tour in 1967. A quick (and quite expensive) transatlantic phone call to his friend and mentor pointed him in the direction of this bass. It was quickly purchase for the first gig the next day and he played it for the rest of his life, through 2011. The “patch and go” repairs that accumulated for decades were undone by the recent intensive restoration from Allan Droyan. This bass is now at top orchestral playing condition.

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Price: Sold